Category Archives: Manga

Something More: Catholicism in Baby Steps, Religion of Eureka Seven, and Idolizing K-On!

What a week for spiritual articles in the blogosphere!  Check out the abundance of posts linked below, a number from bloggers and writers who don’t usually write about religion:

Josiah Harrist beautifully weaves his experiences as the child of missionaries with his viewings of many Studio Ghibli classics. [Christ and Pop Culture]

M.S. O’Brien looks into the Catholic character of Ogata from Baby Steps! [Aliens in This World]

Frank continues to analyze Barakamon from a Christian perspective, finding a number of such themes in episodes seven and eight. [A Series of Miracles]

Frank also looks a yuri-slanted friendships in anime and considers them comparable to the “heavenly friendship” between David and Jonathan of the Old Testament. [2]

R042 dives into the ideas about religion in the world of Eureka Seven in analysis of episode 40. [Ideas Without End]

Medieval Otaku finds the simplicity, tenacity, joy, and dependence of Jinbee in Mushibugyo a model of sainthood. [Medieval Otaku]

Rob uses a picture of a K-On! figma collection to ask questions about idolatry and hobby collecting. [Geeks Under Grace]

Annalyn looks to Fruits Basket, Kuroko’s Basketball, One Week Friends, and Dear Boys for examples of characters who demonstrates a selfless, biblical love. [Annalyn's Thoughts]

Ogiue Maniax looks to a religious example to illustrate the arrogance of the Orbital Knights in Aldnoah.zero. [Ogiue Maniax]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.

Mercy in Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood

As many Christians will tell you, mercy and grace are some of the dearest and most beautiful qualities of God. Not only does he show us mercy every day by guiding us through problems that we often bring on ourselves, but he gave everyone on earth mercy by dying on the cross so we wouldn’t have to take the consequence for our mistakes. Yet when the idea of showing such great mercy is presented to most people on earth, Christians and non-Christians alike balk at the idea. We make all sorts of excuses to avoid giving anything less than whatever we perceive as justice to those around us when they’re in the wrong, especially if it comes at a cost, despite the fact that there are few people who have never received a kindness they didn’t earn.

Mercy is also one of the main qualities of Edward Elric, the protagonist of Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. Unlike the majority of the characters, he actually avoids killing his enemies, for no other reason than that they are human, his definition of which is quite broad. His judgement on this is called into question several times, especially when he has to deal with Kimblee, the Crimson Alchemist.

FMA: BrotherhoodKimblee is both a fascinating and disgusting villain. Unlike Ed, he is a sociopath who places no value on human life and delights in pain and chaos. Even though Ed knows this, when the soldiers at Briggs decide to kill Kimblee and his chimera henchmen, Ed protests, and argues that they should try to capture them instead. His request is denied, and the soldiers of Briggs think his idea foolhardy and soft.

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The Purpose of Trials in Fruits Basket

I have a tendency to shirk away from challenge. Complacency is a hole I feel I constantly find myself climbing out of. If I can avoid it or procrastinate, I usually do. It’s much easier to shove something into a metaphorical box and go watch Youtube videos then actually work through it.

Spiritually in my life, this is something God will tolerate for only so long. As always, God cares much more about me than I do about myself and wants me to have life in abundance, even if that means significant challenge.

There is one scene in Fruits Basket between Kyo and his master/father figure Kazuma that made me think about how sometimes God’s plan for my life and my desire to not deal with challenge, ever, come to a head.

As the cat of the zodiac, Kyo is the most cursed of all of the Sohmas. As part of his curse, he turns into a horrific beast if he doesn’t wear a set of beads and will be confined to a place on the Sohma estate for the rest of his life after high school. He copes with this situation by focusing all of his hurt and frustration on Yuki the rat, the most privileged of the zodiac that was said to have tricked the cat long ago, and keeping almost everyone is his life at a distance.

Kazuma confronts him about this one night.

Capmmmmmmmmmmmture

Kazuma: Is this the way you intend to go on living for the rest of your days? Ears plugged, eyes closed, hiding behind your hatred for Yuki? Read the rest of this entry

Something More: Yuri for Christians, Religion Inverted, and Dostoyevsky in my Nisemonogatari

While Barakamon continues to provide Christian bloggers with some juicy themes (how am I not watching this series?), a number of writers visited older titles this week as they talked spirituality:

Courtney tackles the question, “Should a Christian watch anime?” [Geek Meets World]

Medieval Otaku looks as the falsehoods shown in Nisemonogatari and what role sin and purpose can play in being phony (or genuine). [Medieval Otaku]

Frank reexamines Sakura Trick and whether yuri anime can have redeeming value for Christian viewers. [A Series of Miracles]

He also looks at episode 5 and 6 of Barakamon and finds in them wisdom for Christian living. [2]

Lazarinth points out the theme of fear and religion in a review of Patema Inverted. [Fantasy and Anime]

Rob tells of an unexpected experience he had when apologizing on behalf of Christians at Otakon. [Geeks Under Grace]

Michael analyzes Manga Messiah and shows us it’s gospel presentation. [Gaming and God]

D.M. Dutcher tells how Barakamon demonstrates the healing power of the church. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Dutcher also gives his Christian-centered review of Love Live School Idol Project. [2]

He provides another review, as well – this one of Tenchi Muyo: The War on Geminar [3]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.

 

Something More: Barakamon Christianity, Valkyria’s Salvation, and the Rapture of Tenchi Masaki

In the first two episodes of the Barakamon, Frank finds important points that all experienced Christians should probably take under consideration. [A Series of Miracles]

D.M. Dutcher finds an analogy for the rapture in Tenchi Forever, and examines why that film captures the essence of the rapture better than explicitly Christian depictions of it do. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

What does Saber Marionette J have to say about the value of family? Plenty, and even from a Catholic perspective. [Medieval Otaku]

Medieval Otaku also explores that unusual path and perplexing salvation of Valkyria in Brynhildr in the Darkness. [2]

Finally, he explores Nadia’s vanity in Nadia: Secret of the Blue Water, and discusses snobbery in a number of different groups, including that of the religious. [3]

Rocklobster reviews Rurouni Kenshin (TV), and is perhaps one of the few to really enjoy the story arc featuring Japanese Christians. [Lobster Quadrille]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Something More: Deva Orochimaru, Humble Kirito, and Bishie Satan

The beginning of a new anime season is always fun!  Anibloggers are most active during this time, with literally a thousand or more anime articles coming out this week.  Luckily, a number of those are spirituality-related, and we have a slate of great articles to link to today!

Frank is excited about the new season of Encouragement of Climb, and compares the previous season’s storyline to that of the Christian moving out in faith and accomplishing what God has purposed him or her to do. [A Series of Miracles]

Syng completes a series on Naruto and Buddhism, diving particularly into the characterizations of Orochimaru, Obito, Madara, and Kaguya [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

Speaking of that excellent series, here’s Syng’s first post on Buddhist allusions in Naruto.

D.M. Dutcher tells how a new Christian anime and manga series, entitled Prince Adventures: Anointed, features bishounen characters fighting against Satan (also a bishie). Vic Mignogna, of course, is among those voicing the series. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Oh, and a voice actor for young Jesus has been cast.

Doug, a Buddhist blogger, visits a Mayuka church, home to a native denomination of Japanese Christians. [Essays in Idleness]

Rob continues his Christian-centered anime reviews, with some thoughts about a journey in The World Is Still Beautiful mimicking a Christian’s. [Christian Anime Review]

And while we skipped Something More last Friday, I still want to link to some of the great anime and spirituality articles that bloggers wrote last week:

Michael sees the victory of humility over pride in Sword Art Online as representative of the rule God has established for His kingdom. [Gaming and God]

Earlier, Michael also took at look at Fullmetal Alchemist and dove into the Elric brothers’ thirst for eternal life.

Here’s an interesting comparison – Medieval Otaku sees similarities between the hearts of Lime of Saber Marionette J and Jesus. [Medieval Otaku]

Annalyn weaves a terrific entry about introversion The Kawai Complex Guide to Manors and Hostel Behavior, including a note about how her faith. [Annalyn's Thoughts]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

I wanna be like you, Tohru!

Throughout anime, there are themes that reflect Christian values. You can see themes of loyalty, service, peacemaking, patience, love and acceptance just to name a few. Out of all the characters in all of the anime I have seen, the one I felt has come closest to what a Christian is supposed to be, or maybe the one I want to be like most, is Tohru Honda from Fruits Basket.

Tohru-honda

From her gratefulness, to her constant service mindset, to her unconditional love and acceptance of those around her, whenever I watch Fruits Basket I find myself wishing I would handle situations the way she handles them. It takes a certain amount of bravery and strength to approach life the way Tohru does.

Read the rest of this entry

Something More: Providence of Tokyo Godfathers, Honneamise Religion, and Christian OEL Manga

D.M. Dutcher shares about Tomo, and out of print OEL manga. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Medieval Otaku touches on the theme of providence in Tokyo Godfathers. [Medieval Otaku]

He also explores religion in Wings of Honneamise. [Medieval Otaku]

Rob reviews recent episodes of a number of series, including Golden Time, Engaged to the Unidentified, and The Pilot’s Love Song. [Christian Anime Review]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Something More: V-Day Chocolates for Anime Jesus, Hell in Hoozuki no Reitetsu, and Yuri for Christians

Using Sakura Trick, Frank probes the question, “Is it good for Christians to watch yuri?” [A Series of Miracles]

Jesus of Saint Young Men places third among characters that women would give chocolates to on Valentine’s Day.  Here’s how D.M. Dutcher sees it [Cacao, put down the shovel!]:

“D-dont get me wrong Jesus,” she said, twirling her twin-tail nervously in one finger, “It’s not like I made this for you or anything…”

Dutcher also takes a look at Rescue Me, Mave-chan, from a Christian perspective. [Cacao]

In a third article, Dutcher gives Christians warnings against the trap trope. [Cacao]

John Samuel just watched Puella Magi Madoka Magica: Rebellion, and offers some great analysis, including a mention of one character circumventing free will. [Pirates of the Burley Griffin]

The Medieval Otaku looks to the gospels to help explain the character of Esdese from Akama ga Kiru. [Medieval Otaku]

Jonathan explores the mythology of Hoozuki no Reitetsu. [FunBlog]

Meanwhile, among othres, Rob reviews recent episodes of The Pilot’s Love SongChuunibyou, Nobunagun, Golden Timeand Engaged to the Unidentified.

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Something More: Chuunibyou Faith, Spiral: The Bond of Salvation, and Pope Francis Manga

Due to the lack of spiritually-inclined articles as of late, I’ve skipped the “Something More” column for the past couple of weeks.  It’s time to catch up!

D.M. Dutcher examines how the Blade Children of Spiral: The Bond of Reasoning resemble humanity grasping for salvation from Christ. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Dutcher also delves into Chuunibyou, and finds an interesting connection between the chuunibyou/normal lives and Christian/atheist beliefs. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Regina Doman, author of an OEL manga about Pope Francis, will be on ETWN radio today. [Manga Hero]

Our own Zeroe4 quotes Gurren Lagann as he relates to use his Japanese mission plans. [Zeroe4]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.