Category Archives: Christianity

Your Lie in April, Episode 20: Hands

The visual of a pair of hands can evoke a great many emotions; they can mean a lot of things – steadiness, strength, warmth.  In Your Lie in April, they certainly reveal ability and talent, but in episode 20, the imagery of hands means so much more -they represent both power and powerlessness, the ability to create and the inability to aid.

The episode continues to develop Tsubaki’s storyline and she kinda confesses to Kousei in her tomboyish way.  But as is usual, the plot returns to Kousei, who continues to grow, overcoming his discomfort of visiting Kaori with Watari and deciding to go along with him (and even further, telling his friend that he likes his girlfriend).  When they arrive at her room, however, they find Kaori convulsing and in need of dire attention from medical staff, as Kousei fixates on her hand, which at first grips onto the railing of her bed before falling away.

april 20b

Hands are so meaningful in music.  They, of course, are vital tools for the musician – injury or disease to them can destroy a musician’s career.  As Kaori loses control of her hands, Kousei still has his, and with his dexterous fingertips he creates beautiful music.

But even with that ability, a realization hits Kousei in this episode – his hands are useless to help Kaori.  There’s nothing he can do to help her during her episode, and in fact, he’s in the way, as a hospital staffer declares.

Even worse, not only can Kousei do nothing to help Kaori this very minute, there’s nothing he can do to stop her impending death.  This is demonstrated through his attempt to save the black cat; a metaphor for Kaori and reminiscent of Chelsea, Kousei feels that he is again unable to save someone dear to him, and as he stares down at blood-covered hands, he further thinks because he lacks this power, it’s his fault.

The blood on his hands is as obvious an image as can be – death is coming to Kaori, and there’s nothing he can do.  Read the rest of this entry

The iDOLM@STER Cinderella Girls, Ep. 7: Relational Risk

Episode 7 of The iDOLM@STER Cinderella Girls is an absolutely amazing episode. While the episode itself focuses on the simple matter of getting Mio to return to the Cinderella Project, the situation is explored from various perspectives, mainly with how the Producer handles everything, but also with how Mio, Rin and the other girls react. This means there are a lot of things worth talking about in this episode. I already talked about some of it in my last post on this series, and I will be covering even more in this post.

Those afterimages are not insignificant.

Those afterimages are not insignificant.

This time, I would like to look at the episode from the Producer’s and Rin’s perspectives. As we find out, the Producer has had some history with idol production before, which has affected how he approaches the Cinderella Project. Meanwhile, Rin, who had joined in the hopes of finding something to be passionate about, has only found instead disappointment with how the Producer is handling the matter with Mio. Both of them have found out the same thing: that even if it’s just for business, relationship can be a risky thing, and the end result is not always good. After the jump, I will look at what each of them learns in this episode.

Read the rest of this entry

Examining Old School Anime: Joe Yabuki’s Hard Heart

Greetings to our dear readers!  Having accepted TWWK’s invitation to write for Beneath the Tangles, we decided that blogging about old school anime (anime produced in the 80’s and in prior decades) would make for an interesting addition to the blog and introduce fans to some great old series.  This column shall point out and discuss themes in old school anime from a Catholic viewpoint.  Hopefully, the articles will both encourage you to explore older anime and provide ideas which will enrich your meditations on the Faith.

The salient feature of Ashita no Joe‘s plot lies in that it is a conversion story, pure and simple.  All my articles on this show will relate to this major point, and no better starting point for this conversion story exists than in the unfortunate state of Joe’s hard heart.  Diamonds are less solid!  Joe trusts no one, believes in nothing, and the notion of a good deed performed without an ulterior motive strikes him as pure fantasy.  If God now demanded the two coins of humility and charity from Joe for his entrance into paradise, Joe could offer nothing!

Joe Alone

To make this journey of conversion more difficult, our hero throws up every possible obstacle he can.  In Joe’s trial, it comes to light that Joe was abandoned by his parents at a young age, escaped from his orphanage, and has since lived as a drifter relying upon his fists and his street smarts until about his seventeenth year.  This life in nowise may be expected to produce a gentle heart!  Yet, he has the good fortune of meeting Danpei Tange, a retired boxer living as a homeless drunk.  Danpei becomes enamored of Joe’s fists, and persists in persuading Joe to take up boxing.  The first person to show Joe any kind of affection in a long time, Danpei does things like cover him with his overcoat when Joe goes to sleep and shields Joe from a beating by interposing his own body, which sends Danpei to the hospital.  When at last Joe caves in to Danpei’s entreaties, Danpei becomes Joe’s guardian and works night and day so that Joe might concentrate on training.  At the same time, a group of brats (I’m sure the Japanese term gaki applies to them) befriends Joe, but this association does not lead Joe to become a better person–despite the sincere affection the kids have for Joe. Read the rest of this entry

Gaming With God: Overcoming Our Demons

The latest RPG I have been playing through has been Tales Of Symphonia: Dawn of a New World.

I just reviewed this game over at Geeks Under Grace, so since it’s fresh I decided to write about the two main characters, Emil and Marta. They are the focus of the game, while the main characters from the original Tales Of Symphonia play side roles to help you complete the journey. Emil, though, struggles with a split personality and it’s actually pretty violent. When he is in battle, he goes into Ratatosk Mode, which is where the power of Lord Ratatosk helps Emil fight (the point of the game is to revive Ratatosk and restore balance to the world).

More Than One Emil

Emil has a hard time with this though, because not only does he forget everything that happened while he’s in this mode, his split personality is violent and rude to his friends. When he returns back to himself, he has to apologize and try to figure out what was going on and why his other “self” was acting that way. Marta, who has a huge crush on Emil, gets along just fine with Emil’s normal self but when he transforms, this “other” Emil messes up everything.79-23A78

Emil is the perfect example of, ironically, someone who is double minded. Not only does he have a split personality, but you will see his lack of decision making cause problems for the party and the adventure. He is either afraid to do something or he isn’t sure, so then the other Emil comes in at times to make the decision for him.

James 1:6-8

6 But when you ask him, be sure that your faith is in God alone. Do not waver, for a person with divided loyalty is as unsettled as a wave of the sea that is blown and tossed by the wind. 7 Such people should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. 8 Their loyalty is divided between God and the world, and they are unstable in everything they do.

People are often divided between God and the world, as the Apostle James states, and they can’t decide who to serve. It’s either they want to sin or do what they want to do and disobey God’s laws, or do His will, which at times isn’t what we want to do (though it always leads to the best outcome). Emil is the same; he wants to do the right thing, but he can’t decide. You then see this other Emil come in and make a decision that Emil didn’t want to make, but his hesitation caused it to happen.

Do you see yourself in a similar position as Emil? Are you not following God’s will for your life, because you want to do it your own way? You might not be sure what to do, but when you seek His face through prayer, reading the bible, and asking for wisdom from a spiritual authority in your life (pastor, elder, someone with more years as a believer than yourself), you will get the answer. Read the rest of this entry

Annalyn’s Corner: My Version of the Overworked Faint Trope

Many of us know the overworked-fever-faint trope. In Kaichou wa Maid-sama, Misaki tries to balance her part-time job and her duties as student body president. The stress builds up, and she gets sick, but she refuses to acknowledge it until she faints and Usui carries her home from work in the first episode. Of course, she doesn’t learn her lesson, and she continues to take too much work on herself throughout the anime. The laid-back Usui subtly takes off what stress he can, but she’s not very cooperative.

MaidSama_01

The scenario in Kaichou wa Maid-sama is cute, but ridiculous, right? Sort of. I’ve seen a lot of exhausted students. We become more susceptible to colds and flus, yes, but the biggest consequences seem to be emotional, spiritual, and psychological. In fact, for me, those are the main consequences. And I can keep them under control about as well as Misaki and other anime heroines can control their fevers. Eventually, no matter how much we smile, something’s got to give.

For me, the smiles ended on Friday. I felt it coming. I couldn’t remember the last time I got eight solid hours of sleep. I knew my brain was operating with decreasing efficiency, and my time management skills were dropping as quickly as my processing skills. When I called my mom Friday morning, she wasn’t surprised—she’d seen the signs even from over a hundred miles away. Read the rest of this entry

Something More: Kill la Cross, Madoka’s Universal Church, and Sailor Moon Mythology

Welcome to the first of our more sporadic version of Something More.  The blogosphere has been resplendent in it’s spiritual-related articles the last couple of week, regarding anime series both current and classic.

Christian symbolism runs rampant in Kill la Kill, as do opportunities to discuss Christian themes and ideas, particularly as they relate to clothing, in the series. [Taylor Ramage’s Blog]

The Spice and Wolf light novels paint God as malicious, but does this really to his true character? [Medieval Otaku]

Christianity plays a role, at least superficially, in countless anime series, as Eugene Woodbury states:

At the same time, in terms of theology, the suggestively Catholic Haibane Renmei can stand beside any of C.S. Lewis’s work as a powerful Christian parable. The same is true of anime such as Madoka Magica and Scrapped Princess, though you may have to look harder to see through the metaphors.

But he also goes on to suggest that the Japanese view toward the faith may rather reveal a positive view for many of the country’s feelings toward religion as compared to western ones. [Eugene’s Blog]

Speaking of Madoka, Woodbury recently explained that the series is “an exploration of the doctrine of universal reconciliation.” [2]

Is Mushi-shi a fatalistic series? Perhaps quite the contrary… [Organizational ASG]

To the tune of Christian themes, there’s more to A Good Librarian Like a Good Shepherd than meets the eye. [Cacao, put down the shovel!]

Sailor Moon draws more than merely character names from Greco-Roman mythology. [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

And continuing with Sailor Moon, episode 14 of Sailor Moon Crystal emphasizes the power of prayer…even if it is to the Crystal Tower. [Geeks Under Grace]

The dividing of the girls in episode 5 of KanColle brings to mind the discomfort the early Christians must have felt as they started their mission. [2]

As part of the Something More series of posts, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK to be included.

Your Lie in April, Episode 19: I Offer Devotion

What can you give to someone who’s dying?

Kousei, who’s still merely a boy, doesn’t know what he can give to Kaori – but he knows he needs to give her something.  Sometimes, he brings her a treat; on a grander scale, he delivered her hope in the form of a song in the last episode.  And yet, in episode 19 of Your Lie in April (Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso), he still wonders what he’s able to do for Kaori – in fact, Kousei doubts he’s done anything for her.

And Kousei’s father gives an interesting response to Kousei – he reaffirms what the boy feels, that he hasn’t done anything at all.  But then he quickly follows up by saying, “All you did was show devotion.”

april 19b

Devotion - what a powerful and weak thing.  It can be given by the smallest of children – perhaps presented best by them.  It can be given freely.  But it’s not quantifiable.  Sometimes it’s not even wanted.

But for Kaori, it is wanted.  And it is meaningful.

Read the rest of this entry

The Tangles Anime Podcast: Episode 7

For our seventh episode, we are excited to have Tek7, the founder and president of Christian Gamers Alliance, as our guest. Also, starting officially with this episode, we have established our new permanent podcast hosting team: JP (Japes) and Sean! We have retired the old formula of switching out co-hosts every month, but rest assured, the rest of the Beneath the Tangles team will still show up from time to time! For this episode, we focus our discussion on “Humanism in Japanese Video Games/JRPGS,” but we talk about plenty more, so be sure to give the whole episode a listen!

Feel free to stream the episode below, subscribe on iTunes, or check out our RSS feed!

Also, be sure to email us with any questions you would like included in our “Listener Mail” portion, including the name you would like stated in the podcast and your website or blog for us to share!

Time Stamps:
Intro – 0:00
Announcements – 22:04
Otaku Diet – 23:43
Current Article/Discussion – 37:28
Listener Mail – 1:06:42
Closer – 1:21:58
Bloopers – 1:22:47

Direct Download

Note: Below are the links mentioned in the podcast:

The Power of Kindness in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic was one of those shows I was a little unsure about watching. I mean, I watch anime, play video games, cosplay, go to conventions, etc. but…My Little Pony…Really? REALLY?

I didn’t get into the show until after one year at Anime Weekend Atlanta. We were hanging out watching all of the formal cosplays go into the gala. While we were watching, I really and truly saw some of the most breathtaking My Little Pony cosplays. There is so much creativity in the Brony community. It really impressed me and made me curious about the show.

After the con, I watched all three seasons that were available on Netflix and LOVED it. The writing was pretty good, the characters were so likable, and the show did a good job of telling an interesting story without having a whole lot of drama. It was refreshing and encouraging to watch a well done show where characters were building each other up instead of tearing each other down for entertainment value. The show is so positive without feeling forced or fake.

The pony I admire most in the show is Fluttershy.

mlp 2

She represents kindness in the elements of harmony. I think I am so drawn to her because she has so many qualities key to Christianity that I personally wish would come easier to me. She is patient, understanding, merciful, compassionate and, of course, kind.

Read the rest of this entry

Annalyn’s Corner: Kuroko’s Humble Gameplay

Kuroko’s Basketball has been pretty exciting lately. We finally get to watch the Generation of Miracles go toe-to-toe with each other and with Seirin, and it is awesome. Egos inflate and deflate. Kise and Kagami greet each other with slam dunks before their much-anticipated rematch. Fans cheer, squeal, and gasp both on the bleachers and behind their screens while ships continue to sail. Sometimes, I forget why I’m so excited. And then I remember what sets this show apart: the basketball which Kuroko plays.

In season one, we learn that Kuroko isn’t happy with how the Teiko Middle School team turned out. Everyone else sees the Generation of Miracles, an unbeatable team of allstars. But Kuroko sees athletes who prize their individual abilities above teamwork, winning above friendship, or personal challenge above what’s best for the team. They are immensely talented, but they’ve lost their perspective. Kuroko seeks a team that loves basketball and works together, that knows winning isn’t everything—but will try their darndest to win, because they love the game. This is the kind of team he can support.

Maybe Kuroko can keep his perspective because of his own skill set. Unlike the rest of the Generation of Miracles and Kagami, Kuroko can’t score on his own. He doesn’t even learn to shoot until partway through his first year of high school. Instead, he specializes in passing. When his teammates pass a ball, he briefly touches it, sending the pass in a different direction than their opponents expect. Through middle school and the first part of the anime, he rarely, if ever, holds or dribbles the ball for more than a second—and that is part of the “Misdirection” foundational to his play. He already has almost no presence on the court. He appears too weak and small compared even to average players, so opponents naturally focus on the more “significant” members of the team. Add to that his calculated contact with the ball and the tricks with his eyes, and he can easily direct attention away from himself, becoming essentially invisible. By disappearing, he enhances both the individual skills and group coordination of his team. He plays as a shadow, but that only works if he can team with others.

Kuroko_ep01

In episode 1, Kuroko recognizes Kagami’s strength and promises to help him beat the Generation of Miracles.

Kuroko and Kagami join Seirin’s basketball club at the same time. Kagami is a tall, imposing athlete who has just come back to Japan after living and playing in America for several years. At first, he doesn’t understand why the pathetically-weak-looking Kuroko plays basketball. Kuroko, on the other hand, immediately recognizes Kagami’s strength and chooses to become a shadow to his light. In other words, while Kuroko does work with the entire team, he focuses on providing Kagami opportunities to shine even brighter than he could on his own.

Meanwhile, when people eventually notice Kuroko, they ask each other, “Wait a second… was number 11 on the court the entire time?”

In order to made Kagami shine and contribute to the team’s victories, Kuroko must forgo his own glory. Opponents forget he’s on the court, but they’re not the only ones. Journalists forget to interview him when they talk to the team. Fans of the Generation of Miracles forget about him… if they ever knew about him in the first place. Only people who have shared the court with him acknowledge his strength, and he’s okay with that.

Now, Kuroko’s gameplay has evolved a bit. He finally learned to shoot, and it’s a pretty incredible, unique shot, one that even Murasakibara couldn’t block. His Vanishing Drive starts to draw attention, too… and I haven’t forgotten Misdirection Overflow, in which he purposefully draws all attention to himself, away from his teammates. Kuroko isn’t just a shadow anymore. He’s spunky and competitive and not afraid to show it… If it’s also in the best interests of the team. In fact, in some matches—like the current one against Kise—it would be pointless to start with his normal disappearing act. Kise and the rest of Kaijo would see right through it. Thankfully, Kuroko’s new skills allow him to play on equal ground with the rest of the team, even when he’s not running his Misdirection.  He’s still well aware of his limitations—he’s not dunking anytime soon!—and even when he gets competitive as an individual, it’s more a matter of personal challenge than attention seeking.

Kuroko’s humble approach to basketball has me thinking about my approach to writing and school. I like my abilities to be recognized.  Read the rest of this entry

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