Blog Archives

Your Lie in April Episode 3: Accompany Me

I haven’t perused other Your Lie in April (Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso) posts, but my guess is that bloggings about this series, and maybe especially episode three, are full of personal accounts of anibloggers reflecting on times when they performed at musical competitions with accompaniment.  I participated in recitals and such when I was young, too, and that connection is really nice to relate to in the show.

But perhaps even more relatable, and certainly more universal, is Kousei’s reason for not wanting to accompany Kaori – for not wanting to play piano at all.  On a surface level, if you’re like a lot of my friends, you might remember music lessons as harsh or unenjoyable.  Or striking a deeper nerve, you might remember disappointing others, like your parents.  You might even recall a major failure in your life, as when Kousei broke down in the middle of a competition.

Kousei, of course, reveals in this episode another reason – fear.  He’s afraid to move forward, paralyzed into resting position, as it were, and unable to keep moving forward because he fears what it will eventually lead to.

Kaori Miyazono

All these things that Kousei is dealing with are real problems.  Just as with you and me, they are obstacles that he’ll have difficulty overcoming – if he chooses to overcome that at all.

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Sora no Method, Episode 3: You CAN Go Home Again

Sometimes when you go home, you find that you don’t always feel welcome there.  It might be intentional, as with how Shione treats Nonoka in episode three of Sora no Method (Celestial Method).  Or it could just be that you’ve moved past it or no longer feel in sync with a place.

So, then, why go home?

That, in fact, is the question Shione asks of Nonoka.  Already aggressive toward our protagonist, she takes her bitterness to a further level by slapping Nonoka in this episode as the two, along with Yuzuki and Koharu, team up on an extracurricular “orienteering” activity.  Shione has obviously grown resentful over the years at Nonoka for bringing the saucer into their lives and for leaving them.  It’s just like a teenager, I think, to forget about the possibility that Nonoka didn’t want to leave, but as a child who was about to lose her mom, had no other choice.

celestial method

I thought Nonoka was going to lose it…

Still, why come home?  Nonoka obviously moves back because her dad brings her, but is there a deeper meaning to her return?

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Hannes’ Complacency

Throughout the entirety of my Christian life, there has been one thing that holds me back more than any other. One thing that I fear one day will spell some sort of enormous failure in my spiritual walk. That thing is complacency.

Maybe that’s why I felt more sympathy and compassion for Hannes and his initial actions in Attack on Titan than disgust. At the time of the first attack, Hannes lived a life of complacency. He was a soldier, a defender of the wall, and a committed fighter against the titans. A complacent fighter, but committed nonetheless, if that makes sense. Clearly he believed in the fight against the titans as evidenced by his intention to go after them to “ settle a score.” However, when finally in the fray, he found himself…unprepared.

When we first meet Hannes, he’s drunk. Even though he and his comrades are supposed to be guarding the wall in case of an attack, they have been lulled into a false sense of security by peacetime and the monotony of guard duty.

aot

He laughs off Eren’s scolding him for this, even making a joke that he is probably right about their unpreparedness. But he is, truthfully, convinced that things are pretty much under control and why make more effort than is necessary, right?

I feel like I do this so much in my own life. When things are bad, you better believe my nose is in that bible daily, but get things going pretty good and it’s easy for me to get distracted. I’ll put of reading tonight to watch this show, I haven’t prayed today but I’ll do it in a second, I stayed up late Saturday, I’ll sleep in and miss church this Sunday. I’ll go next Sunday. It’s fine. I’ll get spiritually fed tomorrow.

The bible is clear it is dangerous to adopt this attitude.

 Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

- 1 Peter 5:8

I had a friend say to me very recently in small group, “I just want people to realize we’re in a war.” …And she’s right. I can’t continue to live my life forgetting where I am and what’s actually going on. I can’t act like nothing that big is ever going to come against me. Just because I can handle things right now on the bare minimum of spiritual food and training I sometimes subsist on doesn’t mean it will be enough for what I could face tomorrow.

It wasn’t enough for Hannes, although he thought it would be until the very moment he came face to face with a titan.

“Don’t go underestimating me Carla. I’m gonna slaughter these titans and save all three of you!”

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He had an idea of how he was going to act and what he was going to accomplish based on his personal experiences and his identity as a fighter. But, the damage of his complacency and lackadaisical approach to his responsibilities was too great.

aot 4

aot 3

When actually faced with the situation he was supposed to be continuously preparing for, he could do little more than fearfully run away. The only thing he could do about the situation he was supposed to conquer after that was sobbingly apologize to Eren.

aot 5
That moment Hannes stared in the face of the titan made me think of something that truly scares me. What will be the consequences of my own complacency? Who is going to get jilted because of my unpreparedness? Even though I know who and what I am in the good times, I wonder what kind of person will I prove to be when the pressure is on.

Something More: Serve Like a Librarian, Arrogant Aldnoah, and Doraemon Temple

The fall season is in full swing!  But the articles below are largely for series from seasons past (not that it’s a bad thing to reflect on shows we’ve already finished).

Frank has been commenting on Hanamayata all season long, and concludes with a post covering Christian themes in the final episodes and the season as a whole. [A Series of Miracles]

Frank also extols the virtue of servanthood, as demonstrated in episode 2 of Daitoshokan no Hitsujikai. [2]

Although not specifically about anime, I”d be remiss to leave out Taylor’s recent post on Legend of Korra and facets of Christian spirituality. [Taylor Ramage's Blog]

Continuing a trend of mixing anime with Buddhism, Doraemon has been painted onto an ancient Thai temple. [Kotaku]

Rob reviews season one of Aldnoah.zero, and adds in some commentary on the value of humility. [Geeks Under Grace]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.

Your Lie in April Episode 2: I Stand Amazed

Oh, my.  I think this is the series I’ve been waiting for my whole life.

Kaori Miyazono

Episode two of Your Lie in April takes us past the mere introductions of episode one and shows us what the two main characters are all about.  Kousei is further revealed as a damaged young man, traumatized by his mother’s death (and by her life) – and yet as someone who is intentionally kind.  Kaori, the free spirit, demonstrates both her talent and personality through performance, and shows us a hidden timidity as well.

Kaori’s version draws the attention of everyone in the auditorium – in a negative way by sticklers, but in a very positive way by other judges, the audience, and her friends.  Kousei is especially moved.  Although he find Kaori annoying, and reminds himself of such, that isn’t the conclusion he reaches about her.  Ultimately, he decides this:

She is beautiful.

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Fact Check: Migi’s Claim of Humans as Demons

Parasyte (Kiseijuu: Sei no Kakuritsu) has been a provocative series.  On a surface level, it weaves together grotesque, hyper-violence with humor and a gentle protagonist, while combining modern anime style with 80’s sensibility.  On a deeper level, it also calls forth significant topics – in episode two, we are introduced to a heavy environmentalist theme, as well as something more philosophical.

The Claim

Shinichi, as you’d expect, is having a hard time getting used to alien living on his hand.  He calls it all sorts of names (other than the one it gives itself – Migi), including “demon.”  But Migi has an interesting response to being called this:

Shinichi, upon researching the concept of demons, I believe that, among all life, humans are the closest thing to it.

The rest of the episode, it seems, does a lot to support Migi’s assertion.

Kiseijuu Migi

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Anime’s Common Grace

Note: This article was originally intended for publication elsewhere.  Read The Life and Death of an Anime Article on an Evangelical Website for the whole story.  This post contains spoilers for Haibane Renmei, Puella Magi Madoka Magica, Trigun, and Death Note.

InceptionBlack SwanThe Matrix. These Hollywood hits have a common thread—each was heavily influenced by Japanese animation, aka anime.

Anime has settled in as a permanent part of American entertainment. Besides serving as inspiration for filmmakers, some anime movies—particularly those by Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli (Ponyo, My Neighbor Totoro, The Secret World of Arrietty, and the Oscar-winning Spirited Away)—have found a Western audience. Still, it would a stretch to say that Americans have embraced anime. It remains an oddity—a medium filled with large-eyed characters and unfamiliar cultural references.

As with many adults, when I first watched anime as a child, I didn’t know about its Japanese origins. Dubbed versions of Speed Racer and Voltron stood side-by-side with Disney, Looney Tunes, and Hanna-Barbera cartoons as favorites. Years later, in college, I rediscovered anime and became gripped by the medium’s mature themes, fanciful artwork, and yes, the foreignness of it all. Younger Americans, meanwhile, have grown up with anime, from kiddie fare like Pokemon to action series like Naruto.

Many viewers are drawn toward anime’s storylines, which are far different from those in typical American animation. Despite a growing trend to the contrary, American toons are still typically aimed at children. In Japan, animation is produced for both children and adults. Anime films are routinely among Japan’s highest grossing and most adored movies, while most anime TV programming airs during primetime or late at night. Because it is often made for older audiences, the animation, storylines, and dialogue are typically more mature than in western counterparts, often including heavy doses of violence and fanservice (a term usually used to describe the animation of scantily dressed characters). In America, there’s a certain shock value to seeing something like the hyperviolent anime sequence in Quentin Tarentino’s Kill Bill: Volume 1, because it remains an exception.

Anime also frequently portrays Shinto and Buddhist practices, reflecting the habits of the majority of Japan, where only 1-2 percent identify as Christian. Not unlike American media, it’s more typical to find a vampire-hunting priest or an irreligious Catholic schoolgirl in a show than a Christian character simply living out his or her faith.

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Fate/stay night Unlimited Blade Works, Episode 1: Saving Everyone

Two episodes in, and Shirou is already coming across as twice the man he was in the original Fate/stay night anime.  I’m not sure if this is a correction by design or if the chauvinism he displayed through FSN will rear it’s ugly head as he begins to develop his relationship with Saber.  Still, there’s promise here.

And maybe because Shirou is less “simple” in this series, his idealism, too, is more inspiring this time around than annoying.  Saved by Kiritsugu in the Holy Grail War tragedy that claimed many lives, Shirou has grown up wanting to help and save others – to be a “hero of justice.”  And not just for some – for all:

I’m not interested in salvation that’s inherently limited to a set number of people. I can’t bear the thought of strangers dying around me like they did that day.

Shirou’s altruism is admirable.  And by the end of episode one, he now has his servant – the amazing Saber (right up there as one of my very favorite characters – goosebumps when she arrives on screen!) – to help him achieve his goals.  But will he?  Can he?

saber

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Claymore, Final Chapter (155): The Gospel According to Teresa

It’s here – the end is nigh!  A wonderful, amazing, long-running manga has finally come to a close.

No, not that one.  No, I’m writing about Claymore.

At the end of September, and after a 13-year-run, Claymore finally concluded.  So obviously, it took me almost two weeks to finally get around to reading the last chapter.  But I must say, though the last entire half of Claymore hasn’t nearly lived up to the first half, the final few chapters were very, very good.

But maybe I’m just saying that because I feel they reflect something even greater than the manga itself.

If you’ve been reading the last few months, you’ll notice that Teresa of the Faint Smile, whose shocking death brought notoriety to Claymore many years ago, has returned.  Clare has transformed into her mentor, and Teresa, the strongest claymore to have ever lived, is the only one powerful enough to finally destroy Priscilla.

teresa of the faint smile claymore form

Teresa, sounding quite godly

But is it really Teresa who is victorious?  Well, it is and it isn’t.  In an internal dialogue, Teresa explains that she appeared because Clare’s wishes for and about her, and because of all that Clare had done – improving herself and building community with those around her.  Because of all this, Teresa was able to reappear.  And though Teresa’s physical embodiment will now disappear completely, she’ll remain with Clare in spirit, continuing to be with her.  And as Clare embraces her mentor – indeed, her mother figure – she knows this to be true – Teresa will always be with her.

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Something More: Good Librarians and the Good Shepherd, SAO Friendship, and Moe Buddhist Girl Figures

A new season of anime is here!  Although it may be too early to judge it, at the very least, there’s a lot of excitement in the air for new shows, with fewer sequels and more originals this season, including one that Frank talks about below in our lead-off article this week:

Frank finds a lesson of how Christians should imitate the Good Shepherd in the opening episode of Daitoshokan no Hitsujikai. [A Series of Miracles]

Rob finds that episode 14 of Sword Art Online provides some insight into friendship from a Christian perspective. [Christian Anime Review]

He also looks at the roles of the church body as he reviews episode six of Sailor Moon Crystal. [2]

D.M. Dutcher calls Canon “an interesting shoujo manga with some Christian-friendly themes.” [Cacao, put down he shovel!]

Casey dives into volume one of the Attack on Titan manga, providing a review that’s helpful for discerning Christians. [Geeks Under Grace]

And finally, I forgot to post a link to this article a few weeks ago, but it’s still worth sharing – the moe temple is now selling figures of moe Buddhist anime girls. Yep. [RocketNews24]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.