Blog Archives

Something More: Forgiving Kirito’s Sin, Real Barakamon Church, and Hamatora’s Anti-Christ

The summer season has passed it’s mid-point, and bloggers continue to find great spiritual connections in current series, joining a number of other excellent articles about some more classic ones that posted this week.

Frank finds perhaps an intentional connection to Christianity and Japan’s Hidden Christians in Barakamon. [A Series of Miracles]

Annalyn looks into humanism and Christianity reactions to it and she jumps back into Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. [Annalyn's Thoughts]

In his continuing investigation into Hamatora, Medieval Otaku finds comparisons between Moral and the anti-Christ. [Medieval Otaku]

Casey Covel gives a high score to volume three of the Death Note manga in her Christian-centered review. [Geeks Under Grace]

Rob sees lessons of forgiveness and healing in episode seven of Sword Art Online. [Christian Anime Review]

Rob also finds an interesting lesson to be learned from Kirito’s treatment of Sinon in episode six of Sword Art Online. [2]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.

The Purpose of Trials in Fruits Basket

I have a tendency to shirk away from challenge. Complacency is a hole I feel I constantly find myself climbing out of. If I can avoid it or procrastinate, I usually do. It’s much easier to shove something into a metaphorical box and go watch Youtube videos then actually work through it.

Spiritually in my life, this is something God will tolerate for only so long. As always, God cares much more about me than I do about myself and wants me to have life in abundance, even if that means significant challenge.

There is one scene in Fruits Basket between Kyo and his master/father figure Kazuma that made me think about how sometimes God’s plan for my life and my desire to not deal with challenge, ever, come to a head.

As the cat of the zodiac, Kyo is the most cursed of all of the Sohmas. As part of his curse, he turns into a horrific beast if he doesn’t wear a set of beads and will be confined to a place on the Sohma estate for the rest of his life after high school. He copes with this situation by focusing all of his hurt and frustration on Yuki the rat, the most privileged of the zodiac that was said to have tricked the cat long ago, and keeping almost everyone is his life at a distance.

Kazuma confronts him about this one night.

Capmmmmmmmmmmmture

Kazuma: Is this the way you intend to go on living for the rest of your days? Ears plugged, eyes closed, hiding behind your hatred for Yuki? Read the rest of this entry

Terror in Resonance Episode 7: When Terrorists Are Saviors

Episode seven of Terror in Resonance (Zankyou no Terror) was the payoff episode I didn’t know I was waiting for.

Each succeeding week of Watanabe’s bordering-on-classic series has ratcheted up the tension with our once invincible duo getting closer and closer to having their plans derailed.  The police force started as totally inept, but when Shibazaki came on board, Twelve and Nine had an adversary to nearly matched them, but even he was mostly being used by the terrorists in their plans.  But with Five, we have a character who equals Nine in intelligence, and maybe bests him.

Throughout the episode, Five plays a game of chess, apparently a former favorite between her and Nine, with the boys, but she surprises them by showing the final move is the delivery point of the bomb, which is on an empty plane headed toward them.  No problem, since Nine has switched up security footage and made his way to Five, holding her at gunpoint, right?

Nine and Five Terror in Resonance

Checkmate (sorta)

Wrong, since the suspense further builds with Lisa Mishima in the mix.  Having established her both as an innocent and as loveable (now the moe-building in the previous episodes, which I originally decried, make sense!), the audience is held at baited breath when she’s trapped on the plane holding the bomb.

But with all this intense action happening – and it was indeed great – what excited me the most was seeing Shibazaki and Nine finally interacting in real time.  Though they’re clearly on separate sides of the law, Shibazaki understands that neither wants people hurt here, and he agrees to work with the terrorist.  Already a loose canon of sorts, Shibazaki isn’t afraid to run counter the the culture established within the police department in order to do the right thing.

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A Christian Guide to Comiket

Summer Comiket 86 has come and gone. While for last Comiket, I wrote a personalized post about my first experience, this time I decided to take a more streamlined and general approach. Comiket, as most of you probably know, is the largest otaku convention in Japan, and subsequently, the world. With roughly 170,000 people attending each of the 3 days at the convention center Tokyo Big Sight, it makes Anime Expo and Otakon look small in comparison, with its lines, lines, and more lines. As such, it can be a daunting experience for a foreigner to try out, especially when one does not even speak the language. So if you are at all interested in eventually attending, here are some things to consider.

Tokyo Big Sight

Tokyo Big Sight

Read the rest of this entry

Blue Spring Ride, Episode 7: Honesty

After getting so down on Futaba last week, I was really glad to see an entire episode dealing with her dilemma and her real desire to tell Yuuri the truth.  But further, episode seven of Blue Spring Ride (Ao Haru Ride) continue to showed Futaba’s shortcomings, which are the same we all have.

The show opens as episode six left off, with Kou having stepped off the train to be with Futuba, who has come to terms with her “love” for him.  He notices the scent of her hair.  She falls even more for him and decides she must tell Yuuri that she, too, loves Kou.

But in between, something interesting happens.  Futuba runs into her best friend from middle school.  If you remember back in episode one, Futuba compared herself to Yuuri, having been ostracized during middle school as Yuuri was during high school.  Futuba’s middle school friend had been her only companion, but eventually abandoned her, too, and here we find out it’s because she thought they both liked the same guy.  Futuba makes the connection with Yuuri and Kou and becomes more distressed, wondering what effect all of this will have on their relationships.

ao haru ride

What Futuba fails to realize is that her lack of honesty is already having ripple effects.  Yuuri is worried about Futuba, and so hidden feelings are having an outward impact.  And what if Futuba failed to tell Yuuri about her feelings for Kou until they exploded out into the open?  What kind of effect would secrets revealed have then?

Read the rest of this entry

Honey and Clover, Potter and Clay

A long-running project of mine is to get my wife to become an anime fan.  It started when we were dating and I got her to fall in love with Studio Ghibli.  Over the years, I’ve shown her a number of series, too, and they’ve been a hit (mostly): Clannad, Kids on the Slope, Attack on Titan (I went for the jugular and FAIL), Kimi ni Todoke, and now, Honey and Clover.

Ayumi YamadaEach character in Honey and Clover is wonderful, but my very favorite is Ayumi Yamada.  For whatever reason, I connected with her best, and felt as much empathy for her struggles as with any of the others.  Also, clay.  Ayumi’s talent is my favorite among the cast’s.

There’s something soothing and beautiful about pottery making, isn’t there?  The idea of a sole person turning a block of clay into something smooth and beautiful and useful with just hands and wheel is idyllic.  The same imagery wasn’t lost on the Bible writers, who made frequent comparison of God to the potter:

Yet you, LORD, are our Father. We are the clay, you are the potter; we are all the work of your hand.

-Isaiah 64:8

The comparisons between God and a potter are plentiful:

  1. God cares.  As the potter must carefully and skillfully manipulate the clay to stay from ruining it, God is gentle with us.  His patient and grace are abundant with a people that are far more stubborn than clay.
  2. God is creator.  The potter and clay metaphor brings to mind the creation story.  As clay comes from the earth, Genesis explains that humans, too, come from the dust of the earth.  God breaths life into humanity, as the pottery shapes life into pottery.
  3. God shapes us.  Ten potters can be handed the same size and type of clay, and each create some wholly different piece.  But the similarity is that the potter guides the entire process to make the clay into something more than it was.

And it’s that last point that most presses upon me.  Today, I was reminded what a sinner I am, how vicious I can be, and how inhuman (or perhaps how very human) I am at my worst.  At my lowest, I turn to God, because who else can I turn to?  Friends and family don’t have the power to change me, and I’ve found that I don’t have the power within to transform myself.  But the Holy Spirit can empower us to change and to become far more than we are – nearer to image of Christ.

And in that sense, when we feel like clay – something buried in the earth, lower even than dirt – we know that we are being shaped, molded into the image of Christ.  And in that sense, there’s nothing else better to be.

Something More: Encouraging Hanayamata, Lying Kirito, and Blue Exorcist Theology

This summer season has provided a lot of fun, entertaining series, and surprisingly some thought-provoking ones as well!  One that surprises me in the lessons it gives, as evidenced by Japes’ article earlier this week, is Hanayamata, which has also provided some great material for Frank.  See his article below, along with some other other terrific ones over other series.

Frank looks at the roles and purpose of Christians in his analysis of episodes three and four of Hanayamata. [A Series of Miracles]

Episode five of Sword Art Online 2 revolves around Kirito’s deception, and Rob takes that as an opportunity to discuss lying. [Christian Anime Review]

He also reviews episode 3 of Sailor Moon, and finds a connection therein to Christian hypocrisy. [2]

Matthew Newman digs into Christian principles demonstrated in Blue Exorcist. [Old Line Elephant]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.

Fact Check: Aldnoah.Zero’s Sins

Created and developed far from Europe and the Americas, and conceived in a country where less than 1% of the populace is Christian, manga could hardly be called out for inaccurately portraying Christianity.  It would be silly for calling out mangaka for getting the story of Christ wrong or for presenting the Bible as “just another religion.”  Still, manga is full of religious references to God and gods, which presents a great opportunity to discuss matters of spirituality.  And that’s the idea behind this new series of posts, Fact Check, in which I’ll investigate some of the claims of anime and manga characters and weigh them against the truth of scripture.

The Claim

Today’s claim comes from that PTSD suffering soul from Aldnoah.Zero, Lt. Marito.  When speaking to Dr. Yagarai, and thinking about his past military exploits, he says the following:

Sins you’ve committed cling to your soul and haunt you forever and sins that have gone unpunished aren’t forgiven until you die.

The claim then is two-fold, about how sins affect us both now and forevermore.

Fact Check

Let’s look at the first part of the claim, that sins “cling to your soul” and, like a specter, haunt those who’ve committed them.  I think perhaps few would dispute this portion.  Those who’ve done wrong often can’t shake their deeds, with the memories of such sin affecting their mind and even their actions.  From literature, the great example is Lady Macbeth and her descent into madness after her role in regicide.  But we might also be able to look within at our sins and how they’ve guilted us and maybe in the worst case, caused us to detach from others and become something less than what we once were.

In Aldnoah.Zero, Koichiro Marito reflects his own words.  He is a shell of himself physically, unable to pilot a Terran mecha when a Kataphrakt attacks in episode five.  And though he isn’t drinking by this time, it is insinuated that Marito is an alcoholic, and probably because of his past “sins,” however he would define them.

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Anime Today: Undignified in Hanayamata

14 Wearing a linen ephod, David was dancing before the Lord with all his might, 15 while he and all Israel were bringing up the ark of the Lord with shouts and the sound of trumpets.

16 As the ark of the Lord was entering the City of David, Michal daughter of Saul watched from a window. And when she saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord, she despised him in her heart.

17 They brought the ark of the Lord and set it in its place inside the tent that David had pitched for it, and David sacrificed burnt offerings and fellowship offerings before the Lord. 18 After he had finished sacrificing the burnt offerings and fellowship offerings, he blessed the people in the name of the Lord Almighty. 19 Then he gave a loaf of bread, a cake of dates and a cake of raisins to each person in the whole crowd of Israelites, both men and women. And all the people went to their homes.

20 When David returned home to bless his household, Michal daughter of Saul came out to meet him and said, “How the king of Israel has distinguished himself today, going around half-naked in full view of the slave girls of his servants as any vulgar fellow would!”

21 David said to Michal, “It was before the Lord, who chose me rather than your father or anyone from his house when he appointed me ruler over the Lord’s people Israel—I will celebrate before the Lord. 22 I will become even more undignified than this, and I will be humiliated in my own eyes. But by these slave girls you spoke of, I will be held in honor.”

23 And Michal daughter of Saul had no children to the day of her death.

2 Samuel 6:14-23

Well this is the first time I’ve used such a long passage of Scripture in Anime Today, much less right off the bat!* However, at the risk of falling into the camp of “stereotypical evangelical writer,” it seems to fit well today, as well as make for a nice change of pace in regard to the more regular composition of Anime Today.

Hana SekiyaIf you have been watching Hanayamata lately, then you know that it is nothing if not a normal moe anime about dancing (or to be more specific, Yosakoi)… but if you have ALSO been reading Anime Today, then you know that I am a sucker for exactly that! Regardless of my personal tastes, though, it is always a joy for me when I come across a way to connect one of my more outlandish pleasures with my faith. And in that light, as I reflected on the latest episode of Hanayamata (episode five), I realized that the main characters shared one particularly distinguishing trait with the ancient king of Israel, King David: being undignified.

 

First, what exactly does it mean to be undignified? Simple language study puts together the prefix “un” (not) with the word root of “dignity”. Without dignity. Thus, undignified essentially means shameless. In the context of the biblical passage, King David was so overjoyed for the ark’s (one of the most, if not the most, significant single object in Hebrew’s history, regarding as acting as the “seat of God”) coming to Jerusalem** that he stripped to be nearly naked and danced in front of his subjects completely full of sheer joy.

The king of Israel. Danced. (Nearly) naked.

In front of his subjects.

Read the rest of this entry

Something More: Less Game More Life, Ranma Devalues Akane, and Good Samaritan Art Online

This week was full of great articles about spirituality – many, as usual, about Christianity, but note the first link below, from academic and frequent convention panelist, Charles Dunbar, which focuses on Shinto and Buddhist traditions.

Charles Dunbar investigates A Letter to Momo and discusses the spiritual idea of our loved ones watching over us after death. [Study of Anime]

Frank sees Seishuu’s actions and thoughts as an example of pride, humility, and fear in episodes three and four of Barakamon. [A Series of Miracles]

Michael looks at No Game, No Life and takes a Christian perspective with gaming addiction. [Gaming and God]

He also examines the idea of doing ministry at conventions. [2]

Annalyn digs into Gargantia on the Verdurous Planet and the reason why human life is valuable. [Annalyn's Thoughts]

She also looks specifically at the beauty of women in her essay on Akane from Ranma 1/2. [2]

Rob continues is Christian-centered anime reviews, looking at the idea of forgiveness in Sword Art Online II, episode four. [Christian Anime Review]

He also draws a really neat parallel to the Christian idea of helping others in episode four of SAO II. [2]

Medieval Otaku digs into the complex question of the morality of Kisara’s vengeance in Black Bullet. [Medieval Otaku]

And finally, Josh presents a little baptismal humor involving Sailor Moon. [Res Studiorum et Ludorum]

As part of the Something More series of posts, each week Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.  Thanks this week to Don for pointing me toward Josh’s post!