Ranking Every Studio Ghibli Movie From 22 to 1

Studio Ghibli’s contribution to anime (and animation in general) cannot be understated. Founded by directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, and producer Toshio Suzuki, the studio has produced many of Japan’s most hallowed films, movies that are both critically acclaimed and monsters at the box office. In 1996, Disney partnered with Studio Ghibli to bring their movies to North America, developing a new audience that has since come to age; now, Ghibli is as much a part of American childhood as Pixar and Dreamworks releases.

Several years ago, the studio shut it doors to making new films—thankfully, this proved a temporary move, as Miyazaki is now hard at work crafting his next release, How Do You Live? While we anticipate the master’s next film, here are the rest of Ghibli’s twenty-one releases, plus Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, which is often honorarily included among the studio’s slate, ranked from first to worst (including alternate viewpoints on a couple of the selections).

If you prefer, you can also view the list top-down, from 1 to 22.

Now onto the list!

TWWK

Husband. Dad. Occasionally Korean. Enjoys Star Wars, ASOIAF, and Meg Ryan movies. Tweets before proofreading. Ghibli. Oregairuuuuu. Jesus is King.

3 thoughts on “Ranking Every Studio Ghibli Movie From 22 to 1

  1. Nice to see the contrasting opinions on some entries. Would’ve loved to see more, but I can get why that isn’t the case.
    It does kinda hurt to see two of my top three so low (those three being The Cat Returns, Yamadas, and Ocean Waves as 3rd, 2nd and 1st respectively.) I can get on board with the implied gap between Earthsea and every other entry on the list though. It’s definitely the low point.

    I don’t think I ever felt that Pom Poko was any more obvious or overbearing with its message than say… Nausicaa or Mononoke. I suppose those two movies handled it more elegantly than Pom Poko however; I’ve always felt that Pom Poko is structurally very similar to The Cat Returns, having that fairly typical kids movie progression of conflict and resolution… Maybe that’s where the difference in perception comes from.

    I suppose Iblard Jikan isn’t quite long enough to classify as a movie. Quite a shame really; I always love seeing what people think about that one.

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